Thursday, January 29, 2015

Rock Painting Projects for Valentine's Day

Nothing says "I love you" more than a hand-made gift. These rock painting projects and ideas are unique and whimsical ways to show your love on Valentine's Day and warm the recipient's heart.



Sweet, Simple Gifts - No Fat Rock Candies

Painted rock candies are a sweet Valentine's Day gift to paint on rocks and stones. Learn how to paint rock candy.



How to Create Valentine's Day Gifts of Painted Love Bug Rocks

Love Bug painted rocks would certainly warm the heart of that special Valentine both young and old. Learn how to paint these cute critters.



How to Create a Stained Glass Heart Stone with Glue and Paint

This is a simple project and great for kids. They can easily draw their own design and paint within the lines. See the "how to" for this project.



Painted Heart Stones

You can paint all types of heart designs on triangular and heart-shaped rocks and they make great gifts for any occasion!
Click here for heart ideas and inspiration.



Happy Valentine's Day, everyone.




Friday, January 16, 2015

A Rock Painter's Brain - The Creative Process




Many times an inspiration dictates my next rock painting project. In this case A Crafter's Brain did the trick.

Source: Total Class Creative

Step 1: Once inspiration hits, I start looking for the shape of rock I need. In this case, I had the perfect stone which eerily resembled a skull.


Step 2: I primed the rock with white acrylic paint and allowed it to sit for a while. As I walked past the primed stone, I started to visualize how I wanted to paint it.

Step 3: I decided where facial features would best fit on the rock to allow a large, brain section and then painted only the face portion. (Because I'm not a portraitist, I found many how-to guides for drawing/painting faces on Pinterest.)



Step 4: For a little bling, I used E6000 craft glue to attach earrings onto the stone. (These were small, flower-shaped beads I had from an earlier project.)



Step 5: I spent a few days putting thoughts on paper to gauge the number and size of each brain section I planned to paint.


(For other rock painting projects, I've used a piece of paper or computer paint program to sketch my designs and test paint colors prior to committing it to the rock.)


Step 6: I started painting the sections - sized according to what I recorded on paper earlier.



Step 7: Sharpie fine-point markers were used to fill in each painted section with words. (Note: I generally don't use Sharpies because they can bleed and change color when sealed. But in this case, it would have been very difficult to use paint and brush to write my words.)



Step 8: I continued filling in all the sections with my rock-painting thoughts.



This video shows each angle of the completed "Rock Painter's Brain."



Now I have my 2015 rock painting goals set in stone.

Click here to see how I updated my brain for 2017.